Sunday, January 21, 2007

Kelly Kettle Karrier



An apparently normal Quest on a Berneray beach in the Sound of Harris hides a secret. From outside my Quest looks completely standard... Well here is a shot of inside the cockpit...



OK so now you all know I am a fan of the Kelly Kettle and this is my Kelly Kettle Karrier. Cut from a block of ethafoam and glued in with contact adhesive, it has a piece of shockcord with one of those clever little red plastic shockcord cleats. I normally keep it in a thin nylon drybag and keep the centre full of kindling.


Kelly Kettle in action.

Time for a cuppa!

16 comments:

  1. Douglas, you are beyond hope.


    Best wishes,

    Mark R

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  2. Not only do your photos never cease to amaze me, but your ideas are splendid!

    I'll have to get a Kelly kettle. No doubt when you're paddling, it must be a standard motto, "Douglas put the kettle on!"

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  3. Douglas - what glue do you use! (seriously!) I've had two fixings pop-off the inside of my (your old) boat recently. I've been using araldite (2 tube) epoxy and it just hasn't held fast.

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  4. heard goop (?) was good! A

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  5. Wendy, thank you!

    Simon, I have always been disappointed in the performance of 2 part epoxy glues in a marine environment. Unfortunately the fitting falls off and leaves a lump of epoxy glue sticking to the inside of the hull. I have found contact adhesive such as Evostick to be very effective at sticking blocks of ethafoam. You clean and dry both surfaces with something like meths (industrial alcohol) then spread or spray a thin layer of evostick on both surfaces, wait until touch dry then press firmly together. The Kelly kettle carrier has now been in place for 2 years with no signs of detachment.

    Alison Goop sounds good but I have not seen it in the UK. I know that it is not a contact adhesive like evostick. It might be similar to Sikaflex sealant in the UK which can also be used as an adhesive. Sikaflex dries to a slightly flexible rubbery consistency and I have found it good for gluing small fittings. I think evostick is better for larger areas, it is also much cheaper than Sikaflex which also has a short shelf life.

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  6. Douglas,

    You have converted me, no idea why I would want one but some how it appeals. Should I go for the large or small?

    jg

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  7. John, I have the small one which pack relatively easily and find that if you are careful you can load another full kettle of cold water back onto the embers of the first fire and get a second fire going again. In the review, I was testing the stoves for quick brew performance eg on a day trip, but on a camping trip the kelly is even more versatile.

    First thing I do once I have got my tent up is to boil up a pint in the KK. 1/3 is for a cup of tea, 2/3 is for hot water for a personal wash using an Ortlieb folding bowl and a face cloth. Once in clean dry clothes another kelly is boiled and poured into my small pressure cooker with some stock cubes, shredded bacon and dried scotch broth mix (barley, peas lentils etc). The pressure cooker does home made soup in 5 minutes on a gas stove by using the preboiled water in the KK. Proper home made soup in camp, YUMMY!

    Lastly the KK is an ideal way to sterilise water you source in the field, using wood you have picked up from the shore!
    Douglas :o)

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  8. I also have a Kelly Kettle, the smaller one, but for some reason haven't used it much. A friend borrowed it to paddle down the St Lawrence, but found it too large for his low volume Greenland boat! I recommend a bag to carry it in as the ash soon messes the boat in spite of my cleaning the kettle...

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  9. Thanks Douglas and Alison.

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  10. Hello Michael, I hope you get your KK out of its bag soon. I had mine on action on a remote beach on the south of Bute on Saturday.

    Simon, Thank you, glad to have been of help.

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  11. Jörgen ''COBBER'' van der Pol22/07/2007, 15:24

    Well, I am also the owner of a Quest, but the stove you have is a different one... I bought about two years ago A STRATUS TRAILSTOVE. The fuel is also wood and it works good. Making a cup of hot water will take a short time. Important is not to add to much fuel otherwise it can not breath.

    I made 4 hooks under the deck with a 5 mm elastic cord, and then use a sewerpipe. This gives me again a lot of space to put things in.
    All the foam etc. will not be necessary. some use it for the storage of a KK, I myself use it as a "specsdepartment"

    Regards from the Lowlands of Holland.
    Jörgen

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  12. Hello Jörgen, your knee tube sounds great! How did you fit the eyes for the elastics? One of my friends uses a similar system for his Kelly Kettle but the stainless D rings he Araldited on beneath the deck keep coming off.

    Another friend has fixed a knee tube in with fibreglass matt. He says it is great for rolling as his boat does not have moulded thigh grips.

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  13. Jörgen ''COBBER'' van der Pol27/07/2007, 13:19

    You just have to laminate them with some fibers and it will be strong enough. I do not use it for my knee-support, only as storage.

    I did the same on the sides in the cockpit...rings and elastics and you can put your thermobottle etc. overthere.

    Regards Jörgen

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  14. Love it Douglas!!!!!
    have to add a holder for my small on in the rockhopper as well as the long boat!!!!!

    rob

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  15. Rob, I am glad you like it, nothing beats a cup of hot, freshly made tea on a chilly day. However, the true credit lies with those fiendishly clever Kelly guys from Ireland!

    :o)

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